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toki pona dictionary

This is a list of all official words in toki pona as described on the pages from 1 to 12, arranged alphabetically. You can click on the words to get to the lesson they get introduced in. Each word is listed with different meanings depending on which parts of speech it can be used as.

The “adjective” definition applies to both adjectives and adverbs, as the only difference between the two in toki pona is if they apply to nouns or verbs.

A noun word can always be used as an adjective with the meaning “of [noun]”. For example, “moku soweli” can mean “animal food” or “meat”, depending on context.

This is not a copy of the dictionary as defined in the official book or any other course. Some words may be used as parts of speech other than those listed here. It also lists some unconventional uses of words, some of which are only useful in combination with other words.

In toki pona, you’re welcome to come up with your own phrases and alternative meanings of words depending on context. The most important rule is to make yourself understood.


a

akesi

The word “akesi” used to also mean “‘non-cute’ animal”, but the second official toki pona book has removed this meaning.

ala

alasa

ale/ali

anpa

ante

anu

awen

e

en

epiku (nimi ku suli)

This word is typically used as a form of slang, and has also found common use in “ma pona pi toki pona”’s “acro” games, as the only other non-particle word starting with “e” is “esun”.

esun

ijo

ike

ilo

insa

jaki

jan

jasima (nimi ku suli)

jelo

jo

kala

kalama

kama

kasi

ken

kepeken

kijetesantakalu (nimi ku suli)

This is one of the “joke words” created by Sonja Lang. It has become very popular among tokiponists, as has the sitelen pona character for it.

kili

kin (nimi ku suli)

In the first official book, this word was merged with “a”. However, many people use it separately from “a”. They would only use “a” to emphasize someone’s feelings.

kipisi (nimi ku suli)

This is an old word that was not included in the first official book, but which many people still use. Those who want to only use lipu pu vocabulary might want to use “tu”, which can also be used as a verb to mean “to divide”, the same way “wan” means “to unite”.

kiwen

ko

kokosila (nimi ku suli)

This word is taken from an Esperanto verb “krokodili”, which in turn means to not speak Esperanto in an Esperanto environment.

kon

ku (nimi ku suli)

Much like interacting with the first official toki pona book was given the word “pu”, so does the second book with “ku”. In fact, in lipu ku, words “ju”, “lu”, “nu”, “su” and “u” are all listed as “(word reserved for future use by Sonja Lang)”, presumably to be given to the next five official toki pona books that (in my opinion) should be created in the future.

kule

kulupu

kute

la

lanpan (nimi ku suli)

Without this word, the typical way to express getting or taking something would be “kama jo e …” (to come into possession of …), possibly with additional adjectives like “ike” or “utala”. The word is famously used in the title of “lanpan pan”, the toki pona translation/summary of Peter Kropotkin’s “The Conquest of Bread”.

lape

laso

lawa

leko (nimi ku suli)

This is an old word that was not included in the first official book, but which is actively used by people, as it’s considered hard to express the meaning of “square” without it.

len

lete

li

lili

linja

lipu

loje

lon

luka

lukin

lupa

ma

mama

mani

meli

meso (nimi ku suli)

In some ways, this word is similar to “insa”, but it also lets people say that a thing is moderately X without having to use phrases like “ona li wawa mute ala, li wawa lili ala”.

mi

mije

misikeke (nimi ku suli)

This word was invented by Sonja Lang, but was not included as part of lipu pu. (My personal guess is because “ijo pi pona sijelo” is a rather simple way to say “medicine” without it.)

moku

moli

monsi

monsuta (nimi ku suli)

The usage of this word can be especially confusing without extra context. Some people refer to this confusion as “monsutatesu”.

mu

mun

musi

mute

n (nimi ku suli)

Technically, the word “n” breaks the rules of toki pona by using a non-allowed syllable, but as it basically functions as a word on its own, it’s allowed. Or one can interpret syllable-final “n” as a separate mora, like in Japanese, where “n” on its own is apparently also used as an interjection

namako (nimi ku suli)

In the first official book, this word was merged with “sin”. However, many people keep using it separately from “sin”. “sin” is interpreted to mean “new” and “namako” to mean “additional”.

nanpa

nasa

nasin

nena

ni

nimi

noka

o

oko (nimi ku suli)

In the first official book, this word was merged into “lukin”. People who use this word separately from “lukin” typically use “oko” to mean “eye” and “lukin” to mean “sight” or “vision”.

olin

ona

open

pakala

pali

palisa

pan

pana

pi

pilin

pimeja

pini

pipi

poka

poki

pona

pu

The official toki pona book only defines the verb meaning of the word “pu”. (Although the phrase “pu la” is used in it to mean “in this book”.) Some people in the toki pona community prefer to only use it in the verb meaning, while others use it in others as well.

sama

seli

selo

seme

sewi

sijelo

sike

sin

sina

sinpin

sitelen

soko (nimi ku suli)

People who want to only use lipu pu vocabulary sometimes also use “kili ma” to refer to mushrooms. Alternatively, “kili pi kasi ala” is also possible, since “kili” also refers to mushrooms.

sona

soweli

suli

suno

supa

suwi

tan

taso

tawa

telo

tenpo

toki

tomo

tonsi (nimi ku suli)

The word “tonsi” was created by the community after the official book was released and, according to a poll in October of 2021, is the most accepted “new” non-official word.

tu

Using “tu” at the end of a noun phrase is generally associated with the number 2. The meaning “divided” is usually specified by using a “li” particle:

kulupu tu – two communities

kulupu li tu. – the community is divided.

unpa

uta

utala

walo

wan

Using “wan” at the end of a noun phrase is generally associated with the number 1. The meaning “united” is usually specified by using a “li” particle:

kulupu wan – one community

kulupu li wan. – the community is united.

kulupu mute wan – 21 communities (complex numbering system)

kulupu mute li wan – many (or 20) communities are united.

waso

wawa

weka

wile


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